"It is not suicide…this is a mistake. They say they are going to die together resisting on their land if they removed by federal agents, the military or gunmen,” said Sposati, in an interview with APTN National News from Brasilia, Brazil’s capital. “They are going to stand up and if they start shooting they won’t run."

"[W]here does the anger go? How to place it within narratives of love and compassion, to strike that crucial balance between anger that illuminates and anger that becomes moral authority, as Audre Lorde recognised in “The Uses of Anger”? I am an angry reader a lot of the time and I want to be nice, but niceness rarely allows me to say what I need to say. I also want to be responsible in saying what I need to say, not to let honesty and anger become an excuse to hurt. But sometimes I just want to shout because being told to be nice and positive is often a mode of suppressing something uncomfortable for the status quo and when faced with the authority of reason and objectivity, particular groups of vulnerable are often the ones who already feel the pressure to be nice: women; people of colour; people from other parts of the world interested in Literature and All Its Glory and but who aren’t well-versed in Literary Theory, Philosophy, the Classics, etc.; people whose first language isn’t English but who write and think in English now because fuckyeahcolonialism.[i] (As Lorde reminds us, much of this has to do with trying to avoid the anger of others; there is the need to make nice with racist/imperialist/patriarchal authority so that it doesn’t hurt you further; for bare survival.) Notice the trend that Dean points out: white male reviewers are comfortable with not being nice and writing about not being nice, but female reviewers are writing about being nice. Female reviewers also recognise the burden of being nice and the burden of being subject to (often sexist) vitriol and unkindness."

Here’s a good response to those who tell me and other reviewers/writers/bloggers (especially us People of Color and specifically us Women of Color) to “cool down” and “being cheerful brings more change against [various] isms” when, in actuality, we’re being told - intentionally or not - to water down our criticism against institutions and trends that are adamant on controlling, shaping and silencing our identity(s). Be nice about calling a spade a spade? Can’t do that. Won’t do that.

Thank you for writing this, Subashini.

(via mehreenkasana)


eastafrodite:

Almost a tenth of the women in Iraq are widows.

I think the American public needs to be a bit more concerned about the imperialism our tax dollars sponsor that tear apart families and disempower women (financially and domestically) than whether or not a piece of cloth on a woman’s head is oppressive.


occupyallstreets:

Up To 20 U.S. Troops Responsible For Afghan Massacre
An Afghan parliamentary investigation team has implicated up to 20 US troops in the massacre of 16 civilians in Kandahar early on Sunday morning. It contradicts NATO’s account that insists one rogue soldier was behind the slaughter.
The team of Afghan lawmakers has spent two days collating reports from witnesses, survivors and inhabitants of the villages where the tragedy took place.

“We are convinced that one soldier cannot kill so many people in two villages within one hour at the same time, and the 16 civilians, most of them children and women, have been killed by the two groups,” investigator Hamizai Lali told Afghan News.

Lali also said their investigations led to them to believe 15 to 20 US soldiers had been involved in the killings.
The head of the Afghan parliamentary investigation, Sayed Ishaq Gillani, told the BBC that witnesses report seeing helicopters dropping chaff during the attack, a measure used to hide targets from ground attack.
Gillani added that locals suspect the massacre was revenge for attacks carried out last week on US forces that left several injured.
Meanwhile the US military has detained one soldier in connection with the massacre and transferred him to Kuwait amid outcry for a public trial in Afghanistan.
US authorities are currently conducting an investigation into the motives behind the attack, but maintain that the soldier’s trial must be dealt with by the US legal system.
It is believed that the soldier may have had alcohol problems and been suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder.
Source

occupyallstreets:

Up To 20 U.S. Troops Responsible For Afghan Massacre

An Afghan parliamentary investigation team has implicated up to 20 US troops in the massacre of 16 civilians in Kandahar early on Sunday morning. It contradicts NATO’s account that insists one rogue soldier was behind the slaughter.

The team of Afghan lawmakers has spent two days collating reports from witnesses, survivors and inhabitants of the villages where the tragedy took place.

“We are convinced that one soldier cannot kill so many people in two villages within one hour at the same time, and the 16 civilians, most of them children and women, have been killed by the two groups,” investigator Hamizai Lali told Afghan News.

Lali also said their investigations led to them to believe 15 to 20 US soldiers had been involved in the killings.

The head of the Afghan parliamentary investigation, Sayed Ishaq Gillani, told the BBC that witnesses report seeing helicopters dropping chaff during the attack, a measure used to hide targets from ground attack.

Gillani added that locals suspect the massacre was revenge for attacks carried out last week on US forces that left several injured.

Meanwhile the US military has detained one soldier in connection with the massacre and transferred him to Kuwait amid outcry for a public trial in Afghanistan.

US authorities are currently conducting an investigation into the motives behind the attack, but maintain that the soldier’s trial must be dealt with by the US legal system.

It is believed that the soldier may have had alcohol problems and been suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder.

Source


"Every single empire in its official discourse has said that it is not like all the others, that its circumstances are special, that it has a mission to enlighten, civilize, bring order and democracy, and that it uses force only as a last resort. And, sadder still, there always is a chorus of willing intellectuals to say calming words about benign or altruistic empires, as if one shouldn’t trust the evidence of one’s eyes watching the destruction and the misery and death brought by the latest mission civilizatrice."

Edward Said (via cultureofresistance)

Always remember.

(via mehreenkasana)


verbalresistance:

Iran shows film of captured US drone

Iranian TV has shown the first video footage of an advanced US drone aircraft that Tehran says it downed near the Afghan border.

The film was captioned “RQ170 - advanced US spy plane” and carried on the Vision of the Islamic Republic of Iran Network 1 channel.

The images show Iranian military officials inspecting the aircraft, which appears to be undamaged.

US officials have acknowledged the loss of the unmanned “stealth” aircraft.

Pentagon officials said they were concerned about Iran possibly acquiring information about the technology.

The drone, known as a Sentinel, is the first such loss by the US.

BBC security correspondent Frank Gardner says the intact condition of the Sentinel tends to support the claim by Iran that its forces electronically hijacked the plane and steered it to the ground.

The US says simply that the aircraft suffered a malfunction.

Washington has no diplomatic relations with Iran and US affairs in the country are dealt with via the Swiss embassy in Tehran.

Iranian media said the foreign ministry had summoned the Swiss envoy to to express its “strongest protest over the invasion of a US spy drone deep into its airspace”.

It said the ministry had asked for an immediate explanation and had demanded compensation from Washington…

Read More: BBC News


auntada:

“I wasn’t saved to run.” —Fred Shuttlesworth
The Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth, pictured in front of the remains of his Birmingham, Alabama home. It was bombed on Christmas Day, 1956. Attempts on his life and the lives of his family members, beatings and numerous arrests never stopped this warrior from carrying the banner of freedom and justice. In Alabama, they called him “Black Moses”.
Rest in peace and rise in glory, Rev. Shuttlesworth.

auntada:

“I wasn’t saved to run.” —Fred Shuttlesworth

The Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth, pictured in front of the remains of his Birmingham, Alabama home. It was bombed on Christmas Day, 1956. Attempts on his life and the lives of his family members, beatings and numerous arrests never stopped this warrior from carrying the banner of freedom and justice. In Alabama, they called him “Black Moses”.

Rest in peace and rise in glory, Rev. Shuttlesworth.


jwilliamwashington:

Many of the world’s diamonds are harvested using practices that exploit  and degrade children, communities, the labor force, and the local  environment. Workers are subject to brutality, degrading working  conditions, low pay, and sometimes death. Labor abuses are built into  the industry in many parts of the world, community development remains  stagnant, and environmental degradation continues apace.
Small-scale mining is usually an illegal activity carried out under  dangerous, often unhealthy conditions, and without safety equipment,  proper tools, or recognition from the state. Gender imbalances and child  labor also plague the sector, which is composed of some of the poorest  people in the world. Without formal training or education in their  trade, small-scale miners often rely on harmful practices that can leave  the earth ruined for future agricultural development.
Lack of regulation, harsh labor conditions, and poor wages make child  labor a regular practice in the diamond trade. Children are  commonly considered an easy source of cheap labor and are often sent  into small areas of mines that adults aren’t able to enter. They are  often given dangerous and physically challenging tasks, such as moving  earth from pits, or descending from ropes into small holes or pits where  landslides may claim their lives.
In Angola, a recent study found 46% of miners are under the age of 16,  with many of the children working because of war, poverty, and the  absence of education. And in India, where more than half of the world’s  diamonds are processed, child labor is commonly used for cutting and  polishing diamonds. Taken on as “apprentices,” these children suffer for  years in dangerous conditions for little to no pay until they are  replaced, often by younger siblings.
While over half of the Congo’s foreign exchange earnings are derived  from the export of diamonds, and an estimated 700,000 people dig for  them, most are unregistered, and their efforts are largely unrecognized.  In fact, more than 90% of the country’s $700 million in diamond exports  is produced by small-scale entrepreneurs earning wages of a dollar a  day - the international standard for extreme poverty.
In Sierra Leone, diamond-rich regions remain poor in absolute terms.  Partnership Africa Canada found that Kono District, which has produced  billions of dollars worth of diamonds and is home to the largest  concentration of artisanal miners, has a far higher level of poverty  than Pujehun District, a largely agricultural area.

jwilliamwashington:

Many of the world’s diamonds are harvested using practices that exploit and degrade children, communities, the labor force, and the local environment. Workers are subject to brutality, degrading working conditions, low pay, and sometimes death. Labor abuses are built into the industry in many parts of the world, community development remains stagnant, and environmental degradation continues apace.

Small-scale mining is usually an illegal activity carried out under dangerous, often unhealthy conditions, and without safety equipment, proper tools, or recognition from the state. Gender imbalances and child labor also plague the sector, which is composed of some of the poorest people in the world. Without formal training or education in their trade, small-scale miners often rely on harmful practices that can leave the earth ruined for future agricultural development.

Lack of regulation, harsh labor conditions, and poor wages make child labor a regular practice in the diamond trade. Children are commonly considered an easy source of cheap labor and are often sent into small areas of mines that adults aren’t able to enter. They are often given dangerous and physically challenging tasks, such as moving earth from pits, or descending from ropes into small holes or pits where landslides may claim their lives.

In Angola, a recent study found 46% of miners are under the age of 16, with many of the children working because of war, poverty, and the absence of education. And in India, where more than half of the world’s diamonds are processed, child labor is commonly used for cutting and polishing diamonds. Taken on as “apprentices,” these children suffer for years in dangerous conditions for little to no pay until they are replaced, often by younger siblings.

While over half of the Congo’s foreign exchange earnings are derived from the export of diamonds, and an estimated 700,000 people dig for them, most are unregistered, and their efforts are largely unrecognized. In fact, more than 90% of the country’s $700 million in diamond exports is produced by small-scale entrepreneurs earning wages of a dollar a day - the international standard for extreme poverty.

In Sierra Leone, diamond-rich regions remain poor in absolute terms. Partnership Africa Canada found that Kono District, which has produced billions of dollars worth of diamonds and is home to the largest concentration of artisanal miners, has a far higher level of poverty than Pujehun District, a largely agricultural area.


fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

He was 14 yrs. 6mos. and 5 days old —- and the youngest person executed in the United States in the 20th Century
George Junius Stinney, Jr. [b. 1929 - d. 1944]
In a South Carolina prison sixty-six years ago, guards walked a 14-year-old boy, bible tucked under his arm, to the electric chair. At 5’ 1” and 95 pounds, the straps didn’t fit, and an electrode was too big for his leg.
The switch was pulled and the adult sized death mask fell from George Stinney’s face. Tears streamed from his eyes. Witnesses recoiled in horror as they watched the youngest person executed in the United States in the past century die.
Now, a community activist is fighting to clear Stinney’s name, saying the young boy couldn’t have killed two girls. George Frierson, a school board member and textile inspector, believes Stinney’s confession was coerced, and that his execution was just another injustice blacks suffered in Southern courtrooms in the first half of the 1900s.
Stinney was accused of killing two white girls, 11 year old Betty June Binnicker and 8 year old Mary Emma Thames, by beating them with a railroad spike then dragging their bodies to a ditch near Acolu, about five miles from Manning in central South Carolina. The girls were found a day after they disappeared following a massive manhunt. Stinney was arrested a few hours later, white men in suits taking him away. Because of the risk of a lynching, Stinney was kept at a jail 50 miles away in Columbia.
Stinney’s father, who had helped look for the girls, was fired immediately and ordered to leave his home and the sawmill where he worked. His family was told to leave town prior to the trial to avoid further retribution. An atmosphere of lynch mob hysteria hung over the courthouse. Without family visits, the 14 year old had to endure the trial and death alone.
Frierson hasn’t been able to get the case out of his head since, carrying around a thick binder of old newspaper stories and documents, including an account from an execution witness.
The sheriff at the time said Stinney admitted to the killings, but there is only his word — no written record of the confession has been found. A lawyer helping Frierson with the case figures threats of mob violence and not being able to see his parents rattled the seventh-grader.

This is horrifying. This is so horrifying. Oh my god. 

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

He was 14 yrs. 6mos. and 5 days old —- and the youngest person executed in the United States in the 20th Century

George Junius Stinney, Jr. [b. 1929 - d. 1944]

In a South Carolina prison sixty-six years ago, guards walked a 14-year-old boy, bible tucked under his arm, to the electric chair. At 5’ 1” and 95 pounds, the straps didn’t fit, and an electrode was too big for his leg.

The switch was pulled and the adult sized death mask fell from George Stinney’s face. Tears streamed from his eyes. Witnesses recoiled in horror as they watched the youngest person executed in the United States in the past century die.

Now, a community activist is fighting to clear Stinney’s name, saying the young boy couldn’t have killed two girls. George Frierson, a school board member and textile inspector, believes Stinney’s confession was coerced, and that his execution was just another injustice blacks suffered in Southern courtrooms in the first half of the 1900s.

Stinney was accused of killing two white girls, 11 year old Betty June Binnicker and 8 year old Mary Emma Thames, by beating them with a railroad spike then dragging their bodies to a ditch near Acolu, about five miles from Manning in central South Carolina. The girls were found a day after they disappeared following a massive manhunt. Stinney was arrested a few hours later, white men in suits taking him away. Because of the risk of a lynching, Stinney was kept at a jail 50 miles away in Columbia.

Stinney’s father, who had helped look for the girls, was fired immediately and ordered to leave his home and the sawmill where he worked. His family was told to leave town prior to the trial to avoid further retribution. An atmosphere of lynch mob hysteria hung over the courthouse. Without family visits, the 14 year old had to endure the trial and death alone.

Frierson hasn’t been able to get the case out of his head since, carrying around a thick binder of old newspaper stories and documents, including an account from an execution witness.

The sheriff at the time said Stinney admitted to the killings, but there is only his word — no written record of the confession has been found. A lawyer helping Frierson with the case figures threats of mob violence and not being able to see his parents rattled the seventh-grader.

This is horrifying. This is so horrifying. Oh my god. 


stay-human:

myadolescenceispersonified: “A Child’s View From Gaza”

An Oakland children’s museum, citing pressure from the community, canceled a planned exhibit of artwork by Palestinian youth ages 8-14 that depicted the Israeli assault during the 2008-09 Gaza conflict.

These are a few of the images.

Credit: libyanana for posting it on her wall. (;

Lesson of the day kids? If we just ignore a genocide in progress, it simply ceases to exist. I will not be a part of Generation Oblivious. This is happening and it needs to stop. Palestine will never become a memory under my watch. 


domestic-terrorism:

From Wikipedia

1973 – A coup in Chile headed by General Augusto Pinochet topples the democratically elected president Salvador Allende. Pinochet remains in power for almost 17 years.


The day capitalism went to Chile and kicked her teeth in.

domestic-terrorism:

From Wikipedia

1973 – A coup in Chile headed by General Augusto Pinochet topples the democratically elected president Salvador Allende. Pinochet remains in power for almost 17 years.

The day capitalism went to Chile and kicked her teeth in.


A U.S. diplomatic cable made public by WikiLeaks suggests that U.S. troops executed at least 10 Iraqi civilians, including a woman in her 70s and a 5-month-old infant, then called in an airstrike to destroy the evidence, during a controversial 2006 incident in the central Iraqi town of Ishaqi.

Why? Why was this necessary? What did they do wrong? Is this how we spread democracy? By killing innocent civilians? By murdering children in cold blood?


yourhue:

Just before France conceded to African demands for independence in the 1960s, it carefully organised its former colonies (CFA countries) in a system of “compulsory solidarity” which consisted of obliging the 14 African states to put 65% of their foreign currency reserves into the French Treasury, plus another 20% for financial liabilities. This means these 14 African countries only ever have access to 15% of their own money! If they need more they have to borrow their own money from the French at commercial rates! And this has been the case since the 1960s.

Believe it or not it gets worse.

France has the first right to buy or reject any natural resources found in the land of the Francophone countries. So even if the African countries can get better prices elsewhere, they can’t sell to anybody until France says it doesn’t need the resources.

In the award of government contracts, French companies must be considered first; only after that can these countries look elsewhere. It doesn’t matter if the CFA countries can obtain better value for money elsewhere.

Presidents of CFA countries that have tried to leave the CFA zone have had political and financial pressure put on them by successive French presidents.

This is so many damn levels of wrong.